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Category Archives: Hospital Birth

Birth Out Loud: Premature Labour

by Amanda

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I was 29 weeks along when the cramping started and wouldn’t stop. It really scared me and my husband and we went into the hospital to get checked out. The contractions were coming pretty regularly and I remember laying in triage waiting to see what would happen as they put the monitor straps on my belly. They kept offering me drugs but I refused. I wanted to feel exactly what my body was doing, trying to understand why it wanted my baby to be born so early. The nurse came in and gave me steroids to help develop baby’s lungs in case they weren’t able to stop labour.

My husband sat beside me on the bed while the doctor told us all beds were full in the hospitals in surrounding cities for preemie babies and they were looking into transferring us to Edmonton or Seattle. I cried thinking about if my baby would survive being born this early and I didn’t know anyone who had been through this. The staff was amazing and very loving to us. I remember it exactly as the sweetest older nurse came in to chat with me. She sat down and told me about her own baby born at 28 weeks and how hard and emotional it was but that he survived and was thriving as an adult. Her words were what I needed to hear, to be reassured and loved on. I think that’s what makes a good nurse, knowing what your patients need even if it’s just saying the right words and being someone to cry with. She probably will never know what a gift she was for us.”

 

Yellow Bird Birth

Fraser Valley’s Premier Doula Group providing everything you need for your BEST birth and postpartum!

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She is there.

by Amanda

She is there. Someone to be the “woman to woman” connection that is so primal and instinctive.  She reminds you that your body is strong and was made for this and that your baby is safe and ready.  She enhances your partner’s ability to be fully present for you and help him alongside this beautiful marathon that is birth.

Doula

She knows you through the hours of prenatal sessions together and knows your desires for birth.  She supports your choices and is there to gently remind you what your options are.

She helps you breath and focus, to go inward and let the tightening’s flow as you ride them out.  She keeps the lights low and the space in the room calm so you can get that good oxytocin flowing.

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She reminds you to follow your heart, gut and intuition.

She suggests movements and positions to help your baby move further down, to help you rest and to connect with your partner.  She massages your feet, puts pressure on your back and grabs a cool cloth for your forehead.  She brings you back during transition when you want to close your eyes and are done.

A doula is a woman with experience and knowledge in birth.  She comes along on this journey as a guide and an encouragement.

She is there. 

-Amanda & Jaclyn

Fraser Valley’s Premier Doula Group providing everything you need for your BEST birth and postpartum!

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Prenatal Intensive

by Amanda

Prenatal Intensive: An afternoon of Child Birth Prep

Prenatal Workshop

Sign up today! Email INFO@YELLOWBIRDBIRTH.COM

-Amanda & Jaclyn

Fraser Valley’s Premier Doula Group providing everything you need for your BEST birth!

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Breastfeeding Support: Please Welcome Sharina!

by Amanda

Breastfeeding Support Has Arrived!

Yellow Bird Birth is beyond excited to introduce Sharina Kim, our newest member of the team!

Sharina Kim Profile

Let’s get to know this lovely woman!

I am a wife and mother of (soon to be) two. I love baking, organizing things, going for walks, and chatting with women. When I encountered breastfeeding challenges after my first baby was born, I desperately wanted someone to come alongside me to guide and encourage. Without this help, I found myself trying to figure it out on my own. My personal experience inspired me to become educated in breastfeeding support to guide and care for women in these unique moments of life. In my work, I focus on evidence-based information and guiding women to achieve their own goals for breastfeeding. I visit women in their homes to assess their unique situation, offer personalized suggestions to help them meet their breastfeeding goals, and point them to resources as appropriate. Common issues I assist with include ineffective latch, nipple and breast pain, engorgement, low milk supply, overabundant milk supply, slow weight gain, flat and inverted nipples, pumping and hand expression, returning to work, and weaning.

Contact Yellow Bird Birth today to discuss how Sharina can help you meet your goals!

info@yellowbirdbirth.com

-Amanda & Jaclyn

Fraser Valley’s Premier Doula Group providing everything you need for your BEST birth and postpartum!

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Birth Stories: Whitney and Manolo

by Amanda

Birth Stories: Whitney and Manolo

Photos by Mikaela @ Mikaela Ruth Photography

I first met these two in a little coffee shop down town, they were sweet and excited about getting to meet their little one in only a few weeks.  We had a couple prenatal sessions working on birth desires, massage and pain relief techniques, positions and what to expect through each phase of the birth process and into postpartum.  I know they would make a great team together with the way he supported her and the way she trusted him.

As labour began it was time to head into the hospital…  I will let the photographs take it from there as I prefer the couple tells their own details of the birth <3

http://mikaelaruthphotography.com

http://mikaelaruthphotography.com

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http://mikaelaruthphotography.com

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View More: http://mikaelaruthphotography.pass.us/lukas-birthday

View More: http://mikaelaruthphotography.pass.us/lukas-birthday

View More: http://mikaelaruthphotography.pass.us/lukas-birthday

Huge thank you to this lovely couple for inviting me into their birth team and for sending me these photos to share with you all!  Congratulations on your sweet little one!

Check out Mikaela’s website for more of her BEAUTIFUL work.

-Amanda

Doula and Prenatal Fitness Instructor in the Fraser Valley, including Abbotsford and Chilliwack

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Birth Stories: Jonathan’s Birth in the Hospital Foyer!

by Amanda

Jonathan’s Birth in the Hospital Foyer!

Lauren and Jody’s Birth Story

This AMAZING couple has an edge of your seat fascinating story!  Watch Part 1 and Part 2 of baby Jonathan’s birth in the hospital foyer (in front of Starbucks).

 

Thank you so much for sharing this amazing story Lauren and Jody! What an example of a natural birth with an audience.  Your family rocks!

Jonathan

8lbs 1 oz

11:00 am June 24th

-Amanda

Birth Doula

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Encapsulation Sale!

by Amanda

Placenta Pills

Yellow Bird Birth is excited to offer a FREE Placenta Tincture ($25 value!) with every

Placenta Encapsulation Package purchased from now until the end of May!!!

Placenta Encapsulation is used to help restore physical and emotional balance, prevent or lessen the risk of postpartum depression, increase breast-milk production, shorten healing time, increase maternal energy levels, and provide an over-all feeling of wellness to aid in the transition between pregnancy and the postpartum period.

Register here now as we are booking up quick through the summer! More info on encapsulation and the benefits of tinctures coming this week!

-Jaclyn

Birth Doula, Placenta Encapsulator

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Maternity Nurse: Why I Love And Hate My Job

by Amanda

More than once I’ve said I applied to nursing school on a whim. When I got accepted, I continued with that whim. I have a clear memory of my first year, first semester, sitting with all of my peers, and being asked by one of our instructors what area of nursing appeals to us the most. Like many of my classmates (most being female), I said maternity. “Who wouldn’t want to be a maternity nurse?” was my thought. You get to see babies every day you’re at work!

Well, almost 7 years after answering that question, I’ve got my degree and a certificate to say I’ve specialized in perinatal nursing. That’s what nursing likes to call it, “perinatal nursing.” It sounds fancy, doesn’t it? Yet, there are people out there who have no idea what “perinatal” means. I once heard of a nurse whose I.D. tag said perinatal on it, and someone thought it was her name. So, when asked what I do, I say I’m a maternity nurse, much like what I thought I would, back in that first year of school.

But what does being a maternity nurse mean? Mean to me, anyways? I’ll start by saying I love and hate my job at the same time. It is incredibly rewarding, but can also be overwhelmingly terrifying. I finished my specialty training close to two years ago (but spent a little over a year of those past two years off on maternity leave- my life revolves around maternity in some capacity or another!). While at work recently, I had the pleasure of working with a mama who was getting ready to have her baby (not her first). From the time I assessed her, to the time I encouraged her through the pushing stage and delivery of her baby, I had this crazy high of excitement. I LOVE being present at a birth-I feel honoured to be by a mamas side, to offer encouragement, to help her understand what the doctor just said if necessary, to help her figure out how to have her best birth. Maybe it’s because I’m still new to the world of labour and delivery, or maybe it’s because I really do just love labour and delivery that much, but I get so incredibly excited to be a part of it all.

Newborn Baby

As I mentioned earlier though, I also hate it. Labour and delivery comes with so many unknowns. When you come to the hospital to have your baby, most likely you’re just thinking of meeting that baby. Your nurse is thinking of how you get to meet your baby, but also is thinking of what could go wrong. I won’t get into details, but there are a myriad of things that may go wrong (more often that not, though, things go smoothly), so we’re constantly prepared for any outcome (but of course, we’re always rooting for a screaming baby at delivery!). Those unknowns are really the only part I hate.

I’ve done a fair amount of rambling, for which I apologize. So I’ll finish with this-I love being a maternity nurse. It’s an honour to meet someone and help them navigate through one of the most important moments of their life. That moment they meet their baby, both moms and dads, whether it’s their first baby or their tenth. Becoming a maternity nurse is one of the best decisions I’ve ever made, even if it did all start on a whim.

-Darcie Eckert

Perinatal (Maternity) Nurse

Homebirth In The Hospital

by Amanda

5 Way to Make Hospital Birth Feel More Like Home

A Home birth is a unique experience they cannot be replicated in another setting, but when birthing at home isn’t an option or desire for you, here are simple ideas that can make your hospital stay more comfortable.

Walking into the sterile room with supplies, equipment and bright lights isn’t exactly the most welcoming environment to birth your baby. Staff coming in and out, leaving doors open and turning on machines with loud beeping noises is definitely a change from your peaceful setting in your own bedroom. While this can sometimes lead to initial emotions of anxiety or fear of a new place, there are many things your birth team to do to make this room feel like home (or close to!).

The perfect environment for giving birth is a warm, safe, private, quiet and dark place. Encourage your team to take control and make this place your own!

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Entering the Hospital

 

1. Turn off the lights
Women often begin their birth process during the night, in the dark and can often stall once a women walks into the hospital with bright lights and an unfamiliar setting. This study’s abstract says this in conclusion: “[Melatonin] synergizes with [oxytocin] to promote [uterine smooth muscle] contractions and to facilitate gap junction activity [in a controlled testing environment]. Such a synergy in [a living human] would promote coordinated and forceful contractions of the late term pregnant uterus necessary for [childbirth]” (Sharkey, Puttaramu, Word and Olcese, “Melatonin Synergizes with Oxytocin to Enhance Contractility of Human Myometrial Smooth Muscle Cells“).

2. Candles and Music
Think of a romantic evening, where you are relaxed and safe and the oxytocin (also known as the love drug) is flowing. What do you see, hear and feel? Recreate that in your hospital room, after all, how are babies best conceived? Bring beautiful music and battery operated candles. Place the candles around the room and around the bath/shower area. Watching the glow can be a great focus for you during your waves.

3. Decorations and Linens
I always wonder how a woman can spend many hours thinking about the decorations for her wedding, the exact colours that please her, the beautiful fabrics and flowers that will surround her and her love on their special day but not plan how her birthing room will look. This woman brought her birth affirmation flags from her blessing way and fabric to cover the cushions. She was able to look up during the intense parts of her birth and see love from her circle of supporting women. The room looked like a bedroom with their own blankets, pillow cases, and photos that reminded them of home.

Birthing Affirmation Flags

Birthing Affirmation Flags

 

4. Re-organize the Room
Clients often aren’t aware that they can rearrange the non-medical furniture in the room. That bed in the middle of the room calling to you for relief, MOVE IT! Push it to the side. Birth is best done moving around and trying different positions for different stages. Women are drawn to crawl right into the bed. Take the sheets and lay them on the floor so you don’t have to worry about being on your knees or standing on the hospital floor. Use the towels and pillows and blankets. Make it your own.

5. Food and Drinks!
At our local hospital at 2am there is nothing around but some vending machines and a fridge with juice and popsicles. Pack nourishing snacks like nuts, veggies, fruit, crackers and cheese. Food that makes you feel good and gives you energy for your birth and for your team. Bring your own tea or juices that are maybe a bit healthier than what the hospital offers. The birthing suites usually will have their own mini fridge or a communal fridge in the kitchen on each floor.

With a fear of not wanting to be “the too much to deal with patient”, we fall into the thought of being a house guest in the hospital. Nervous to ask for extra supplies or make yourself at home, but you and your birth team can take control and maintain a respectful relationship with the staff at the same time. Remember, you are paying for this, make it your own!

Happy Birthing!